Hoppa till sidans innehåll

Sports in Sweden


This section brings the reader a general overview of Sweden and an explanation to the forms and traditions that Swedish sports use. The text below, which is taken from the Swedish Sports Confederation's website, is slightly revised by the author of the article.

 

Sports in Sweden
In relation to its geography and population, Sweden is one of the world's most sporting nations. Almost half of Sweden's seven million inhabitants between the ages of 7 and 70 are members of a sports club - as active competitors, keep-fitters, leaders, trainers or supporters. Some two million of these are active sportsmen and women. About 650 000 engage in competitive sports at various levels and roughly 7 000 can be said to belong to the élite; that is, they compete at national championship level.

Characteristics of the Swedish sports movement are:

  • Independent
  • Non-profitable
  • Democratic
  • Based on voluntary, leadership and work
  • Open for all
  • Dynamic
  • Important factor for development in society

Sweden - a geographical overview
Sweden is part of the Scandinavian peninsular and, in area, the fifth largest country in Europe. In terms of population it ranks as one of the smallest European countries. Close to nine million people are spread over 450 000 km2 a population of about 20 people per square kilometre.

In comparison with most other countries, Sweden is situated extremely far north. At commensurate latitudes in Canada and Greeland people move about using snowshoes and sledges. But thanks to the Gulf Stream which crosses the Atlantic bringing warmer air to this part of Europe, Sweden enjoys a much milder climate.

The northernmost part of Sweden is situated above the polar circle while the most southerly part lies in the temperate continental climatic zone. There can be snow and ideal skiing conditions in the north while they are playing football in the south. The distance between the northern and southern extremes of Sweden is 1 500 km, the same distance that separates Copenhagen and Rome. Most Swedes live in the southern and central parts of the country.

 

Unique public access to the countryside
Sweden is one of the countries most richly endowed with lakes, numbering some 96 000 within its borders. The coastline, with all its numerous indentations, stretches for 7 600 km. There are also many vast forests. More than 50 percent of the country is forest and a further 20 percent consists of bogs, heathlands and bare mountains.

The countryside is open to everybody under the "The Right of Common Access", a unique Swedish right which allows everyone to move freely in forest and field and to pick fungi, berries and wildflowers. It also guarantees the right to swim in and boat on lakes, rivers and other open water. But the right also prescribes an obligation to show consideration to people, ani­mals and the natural environment.

Swedes spend a lot of time in the outdoors, making constant use of the countryside for sports such as orienteering, sailing, canoeing and skiing. Being so used to outdoor activities means that the Swedes have a built-in appreciation of and respect for nature and the environment. This is not least apparent at sports competitions and championships where the greatest possible consideration is given to wildlife and vegetation.  

 

Swedes on the move
In relation to its geography and population, Sweden is one of the world's most sporting nations. Almost half of Sweden's seven million inhabitants between the ages of 7 and 70 are members of a sports club - as active competitors, keep-fitters, leaders, trainers or supporters. Some two million of these are active sportsmen and women. About 650 000 engage in competitive sports at various levels and roughly 7 000 can be said to belong to the élite; that is, they compete at national championship level.

Sport has an even more dominant position among youngsters. More than two out of every three boys and every other girl between the ages of 7 and 15 belong to a sports club. The profile of Swedish sports is youth sports and sport for all.

There are some 22 000 sports clubs in towns and villages throughout Sweden besides the 7 000 sports clubs attached to companies. Many people travel long distances to participate and to train. The large geographical distances mean that travelling absorbs a substantial share of clubs' financial resources.

 

The Swedish system of Gymnastics
Gymnastics was the first sport to bring Sweden to international notice. In the early nineteenth century Per Henrik Ling created a system for building up the body's strength and suppleness. The system was generally known as "The Swedish System of Gymnastics" and became famous throughout Europe and even in more distant parts of the world. In some Latin American countries Ling's gymnastics achieved such a dominating position that physical training in schools was called, quite simply, "Swedish Gymnastics".

Today Swedish sport is best known on account of the success of Swedish teams and individual sportsmen and women. For example in, skiing, sailing, icehockey, handball, table tennis, tennis, golf, car rally, motorcycle, bowling, canoeing, orienteering and sports for the disabled.

 

The social value of top sports
Top sports are seldom granted their real, profound social value. Our top athletes provide inspiration for coming generations to participate in sports and they stimulate adults to exercise. But they also provide entertainment and excitement in everyday life. Every culture at every time in history has its heroes - today’s heroes are top athletes.

There is also a significant social value in the fact that we get up out of our seats in front of the TV to go and watch a live match or other sporting event. On the terraces we experience and give expression to our feelings. There is a camaraderie among spectators regardless of class.

But at times feelings become too strong and hooliganism takes over. Sweden has not been spared the problems that are caused by hooligans, most usually in football and ice hockey. Since 1995 the Swedish Sports Confederation has been promoting the nation-wide campaign “Supporter culture” which strives for a positive supporter culture and well-managed public arrangements. More specifically the task involves analyzing what takes place and co-ordinating contributions from sports associations, clubs, the police, the authorities and the owners of premises (usually the local authority). The "supporter culture" project participates in the training of match hosts and security functionaries.  

 

Seventh in the Olympic medals table
Legendary figures have emerged from this ocean of people. People like Gunder Hägg, Ingemar Johansson, Gert Fredriksson, "Nacka" Skoglund, Sven Tumba, Toini Gustavsson, Björn Borg, Ingemar Stenmark, Gunde Svan, Ulrika Knape, Anders Gärderud, Annichen Kringstad and Stefan Edberg have for ever carved their names into the Swedish soul. In recent years stars such Jan-Ove Waldner, Ludmila Engqvist, Peter Forsberg, Annika Sörenstam, Jesper Parnevik, Thomas Engqwist, Pernilla Wiberg and Fredrik Ljungberg have kept the Swedish colours flying high in international arenas.

Uppdaterad: 03 NOV 2008 19:32 Skribent: Kristian Pälviä

KONTAKTA/FÖLJ SBSF

contact-follow-mail&tel-60x60 contact-follow-facebook-60x60    

 

 

BÖRJA SPELA MED OSS!

Hitta en klubb för dig! 

HITTA DIN NÄRMASTE FÖRENING!


www.swedishbirchbats.com 


MLB.com




INTERNATIONELLA OCH EUROPEISKA FÖRBUND

CONFEDERATION OF EUROPEAN BASEBALL

EUROPEAN SOFTBALL FEDERATION

LITTLE LEAGUE INTERNATIONAL


 

LITTLE LEAGUE SVERIGE

Postadress:
Svenska Baseboll och Softboll Förbundet
Box 11016
100 61 Stockholm

Kontakt:
Tel: 086996535, 086996535
E-post: info@baseboll-softbo...